Slowing Down

 

20140513-191135.jpgJust started playing around with an app I’ve had for awhile now…SlowShutter – lots of fun with very little effort.

I’m one of those people who reads about a technique, gets everything I need to ‘do’ that technique, then promptly loses interest in said technique only to stumble upon it much later and usually by accident.

I guess that’s not necessarily a bad thing – things tend to happen more naturally and without any preconceived expectations this way.

One cool thing about this app is the ability to see the image you made in various stages of capture and selecting that exposure using the ‘freeze’ slider.

Of course, I’m just assuming that’s what the slider is for – I never bother watching the tutorials either!

PS…guess my laptop had a relapse…please bear with me while I figure out how to post with images via iPad – thanks!!

Klimt-ish

klimtish

Here’s another example of building on what you have…in this case, I snapped a photo of one of my dried paint palettes and layered a couple more images from my camera roll.

I’m really enjoying the freedom that limiting myself to the iPhone has given me.

Sometimes it’s the most unlikely pairings that end up with the most surprising outcomes!

Happenstance

happenstance

So……

I’ve been playing around with apps lately.

This image is the same image from yesterday’s post (can you believe it?) – amazing what you can do with apps these days, isn’t it.

I would share the technique I used, if only I could remember what it was!  I’ve been going back and forth between two books; Surreal Photography: Creating the Impossible, by Daniela Bowker and The Art of iPhoneography, by Stephanie C. Roberts (ironic, considering I’m using an Android at the moment), and I’m not sure which app I ended up using for this image.

But both of the books are great and full of inspiration.

Its a lot of fun to play with apps; to select an image already in your gallery,  and just see what happens.

I mean, look at the difference between these two photos!!  And this was from (literally) about 3 minutes of experimenting time.